Good ideas for good teachers who want good jobs

By: Gerald Haigh


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Size: 148 x 210mm

Pages : 176

ISBN : 9781845909512

Format: Paperback

Published: March 2015


This to-the-point little guide contains everything you need to know about jobs, career progression and interviews. Good teachers deserve the good guide.

You're a good teacher. Don't be modest, you know you are. The key to satisfaction lies in knowing who you are and what you want, and then making the choices that suit. The real aim here is to make sure that as you approach each step on the career ladder, the choices you make and the actions you take are really worthy of your status as a good teacher. That's to say they will be deeply considered, well-researched, honest and self-aware and carried out with confidence and professionalism.

Good teachers are flexible visionaries. Good teachers are doers. Good teachers know where to find the jobs. Good teachers do not count their chickens. Good teachers know that, in job hunting, knowledge is power. Good teachers know how to fill in application forms. Good teachers have good answers to interview questions. Good teachers avoid interview pitfalls. Good teachers don't feel rejected. Good teachers are decisive about the job offer.


Picture for author Gerald Haigh

Gerald Haigh

Gerald Haigh  had a long and varied career in education. He was a teacher for 30 years, 11 of them as a middle school head and was also a governor and an external examiner for two teacher training establishments. He wrote about education throughout his career, as the author of various books and in the Times Educational Supplement. In Good Ideas For Good Teachers Who Want Good Jobs  he shared everything he learnt about jobs and interviews, helping good teachers to get the jobs they want.

Click here to read Gerald's article on SecEd discussing Career Development.

Click here to read Gerald's article on the spelling, punctuation and grammar (SPAG) regime on page 16 in SchoolsWeek.


Reviews

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  2. It is very easy to get complacent and comfortable at your current school, working with teaching colleagues, the kids are great, and all seems well. Some people are like this, and good luck to them, but others are thinking about the next step on their career path, which might not necessarily include the school where they currently work. Let's face it, we live in a world where a job is not for life, and we all need to make sure we are well placed when taking the next steps in our career.

    In his new book, Gerald Haigh provides a guide that contains everything you need to know about interviews, jobs and career progression. He makes sure that as you approach each step on the career ladder, the choices you make and the actions you take are really worthy of your status as a good teacher. As a good teacher you can carve out the career that suits you - on a ladder leading to headship and beyond, or on a winding and intriguing path through a series of jobs that broaden your experience of life.

    Good teachers are flexible visionaries. Good teachers are doers. Good teachers know where to find the jobs. Good teachers do not count their chickens. Good teachers know that, in job hunting, knowledge is power. Good teachers know how to fill in application forms. Good teachers have good answers to interview questions. Good teachers avoid interview pitfalls. Good teachers don't feel rejected. Good teachers are decisive about the job offer.

    This is an easily digestible book, that won't get you bogged down throughout the application process. The straight talking nature of the text reassures you, and helps you celebrate what is good about your career so-far, and gives you a helping hand in securing your next job.



    See the orginal review here: http://ukedchat.com/2015/06/05/ukedmag-good-ideas-for-good-teachers-who-want-good-jobs-by/
  3. Gerald Haigh in his own inimitable style has produced an easily read book full to the brim with advice, tips, tricks and awareness of pitfalls for teachers of all ages considering applying for teaching posts.  The advice for newcomers to the teaching profession is excellent.  The author covers key issues such as making applications, doing groundwork, school visits, how to sell yourself at interview, teaching a good demonstration lesson, within an easily read and highly informative format.  The use of cartoons to illustrate key points discussed is particularly helpful for the reader

    With the current  emphasis on performance management, performance reviews, and changing management structures within schools, in particular the growth of academies and free schools, many teachers have become restless  and anxious regarding the fear of redundancy. As a consequence,  although keen to move their careers forward individuals may lack the skills to effectively market themselves. This book is a “must read” for all teachers considering moving on or being forced into change fora variety of reasons.  Gerald Haigh has produced a brilliantly written book full of common sense and realistic ideas which should be available in all staff rooms.
  4. This guide contains everything you need to know about career progression. Haigh tackles each step of the career ladder and offers good ideas for good teaching.
  5. Are you happy where you are right now, as a professional educator? Is your job just challenging enough; your stress levels manageable and your leadership team supportive? Or do you perhaps wonder whether you should be thinking about moving - upwards, onwards, or both? These are questions that every teacher needs to ask him or herself regularly; but sometimes it can be hard to come up with clear responses, especially when the head and the heart appear to be at odds with each other. Wouldn't it be great, then, if you could call on your own, personal mentor to help you organise your thinking? With Gerald Haigh's smart, knowledgeable guide to interviews, job and career progression, that's pretty much exactly what you get- like an experienced friend with your best interests in mind, he sets out all the information you need to make those key decisions, but remains satisfyingly focused on getting you to come up with your own answers, and trust them, rather than telling you what to do.
  6. Full of common sense advice for ambitious teachers, at any stage in their career, who wish to take control of their career path. It is certainly a -˜must read' for those wishing to make healthy career choices. The section on paying attention to your public profile is particularly relevant at the moment. Certainly one I will be recommending to staff at my school. Once again, the Key Points summary at the end of each chapter are useful little -˜notelets'. The illustrations are perfect and made me smile and the thought provoking questions throughout the text are cleverly written and make you think more carefully about the decisions you make.
  7. Imagine the scene. You meet an old and trusted friend in a coffee shop for a catch-up gossip and, as naturally happens, the subject of work comes up. You admit to thinking of moving on but aren't sure. At this point your old and trusted friend begins to expertly help you un-pick and explore your thoughts about a new job. After a long, caffeine-fuelled, discussion you have your eureka moment and your future career is paved in yellow bricks ahead of you. Easy. But for those of us without such a friend, where do we go to get our thinking unpicked? Grab a coffee and get ready to decide whether you're a -˜gunner' or a -˜doer'!

     

    Gerald Haigh provides a fully comprehensive toolkit of thoughts, prompts, key ideas and questions to help us consider our current and potential new roles. Every aspect of the procedure is considered from motivation to move (or stay put), applications, school visits, a big section on the interview process and finally dealing with outcome. As a headteacher who has interviewed a decent number (and range) of candidates, this book still gave me tips, tricks and food for thought. One important point to note here is that Gerald never preaches. In fact the book is written in a challenging but supportive way; he maintains a -˜coaching' feel throughout. His use of humour is great (I love the phrase -˜hearing aid beige used car') making a relatively serious subject light-hearted and entertaining. I must admit to expecting a book about getting a job to be fairly dull but the writing style and organisation of the information, into easily readable chunks, meant I'd read far more than I expected in one sitting. My only concern is that this book may make the recruitment process even harder, with an increased number of good candidates to choose from - what a great problem to have!

     



    Just about everyone needs to read this book. Even if you are part of the foundations of your school with no intention of moving on, this book will help you evaluate your decisions and aspirations. Oh, and despite the title, I'm sure even the outstanding teachers are allowed to read it!
  8. Gerald Haigh is one of the most insightful and experienced education writers there are. His wisdom has graced the pages of SecEd for several years and the journal is all the stronger for it.
  9. Good teachers will be great if they take these tips on board. All the things that your supportive boss hoped that you would osmotically pick up! I always tell staff to -˜try before you buy' in terms of future posts, if they read this perhaps they will now listen.

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