Making Every History Lesson Count

Six principles to support great history teaching

By: Chris Runeckles


£12.99

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Ebook


Size: 216 x 135mm

Pages : 160

ISBN : 9781785833366

Format: Paperback

Published: October 2018


Chris Runeckles' Making Every History Lesson Count: Six principles to support great history teaching offers lasting solutions to age-old problems and empowers history teachers with the confidence to bring their subject to life.

Making Every History Lesson Count goes in search of answers to the crucial question that all history teachers must ask: 'What can I do to help my students retain and interrogate the rich detail of the content that I deliver?-

Writing in the practical, engaging style of the award-winning Making Every Lesson Count, Chris Runeckles articulates the fundamentals of great history teaching and shares simple, realistic strategies designed to deliver memorable lessons. The book is underpinned by six pedagogical principles ' challenge, explanation, modelling, practice, feedback and questioning ' and equips history teachers with the tools and techniques to help students better engage with the subject matter and develop more sophisticated historical analysis and arguments.

In an age of educational quick fixes and ever-moving goalposts, this carefully crafted addition to the Making Every Lesson Count series expertly bridges the gap between the realms of academic research and the humble classroom. It therefore marries evidence-based practice with collective experience ' and, in doing so, inspires a challenging approach to secondary school history teaching.

Making Every History Lesson Count has been written for new and experienced practitioners alike, offering gimmick-free advice that will energise them to more effectively carve out those unique moments of resonance with young people. Each chapter also concludes with a series of questions that will prompt reflective thought and enable educators to relate the content to their own classroom practice.

Suitable for history teachers of students aged 11'16 years.


Picture for author Chris Runeckles

Chris Runeckles

Chris Runeckles is an experienced history teacher at Durrington High School, where he currently leads on teaching and learning and is an assistant director of their Research School. A former journalist, Chris also regularly contributes to the popular blog Class Teaching and tweets @chris_runeckles.


Reviews

  1. Written especially for classroom history teachers of students aged 11 to 16 years, -˜Making Every History Lesson Count: Six Principles to Support Great History Teaching' by Chris Runeckles offers invaluable and lasting answers and solutions to the crucial question that all history teachers must ask: What can I do to help my students retain and interrogate the rich detail of the content that I deliver? Writing in the practical, engaging style 'Making Every History Lesson Count' articulates the fundamentals of great history teaching and shares simple, realistic strategies designed to deliver memorable lessons. Underpinned by six pedagogical principles with the tools and techniques to help students better engage with the subject matter and develop more sophisticated historical analysis and arguments, -˜Making Every History Lesson Count' expertly bridges the gap between the realms of academic research and the humble classroom by blending evidence-based practice with collective experience and, in doing so, inspires a challenging approach to secondary school history teaching. Of special note is that each chapter concludes with a series of questions that will prompt reflective thought and enable educators to relate the content to their own classroom practice. While unreservedly recommended for school district, college and university library Teacher Education instructional reference collections, it should be noted for personal reading lists that -˜Making Every History Lesson Count' is also available in a digital book format.
  2. Making Every History Lesson Count is a great achievement and an important and very welcome piece of work. Illuminated by unfussy diagrams and charts, its six main principles are clear, sensible and disciplinarily authentic -“ and Chis Runeckles' writing is refreshingly free of confusing jargon, which helps make the book an accessible and pleasurable read. It draws on recent developments in cognitive psychology and is supported by the work of some of England's most original thinkers from both within and outside the history teaching community.



    Trainee, newly qualified and less experienced teachers will find Making Every History Lesson Count invaluable, while department heads would be wise to read it too -“ as it has some powerful insights regarding the formation of sensible policy for the teaching of history. I wish I'd read it when I first started teaching.
  3. History is a living subject and one that prepares children for the future by helping them analyse the past. In Making Every History Lesson Count Chris Runeckles draws out the subject's human aspect and communicates this with aplomb.

    Chris' focus on research underpins long-standing -œgivens- around good teaching -“ knowledge, storytelling, questioning and the interrogation of resources -“ and invites teachers to enhance their own classroom practice and delivery.

    A really useful guide for the busy history teacher.

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