Georgina Jonas writes for Headteacher Update

26 January 2017

Georgina Jonas, the pen name for the collective talent that wrote our recently published The College Collection series, has written a piece on the Headteacher Update website sharing their ideas and strategies for engaging reluctant readers.

Click here to read the article and here to take a closer look at the series.

The College Collection centres around five main characters, Luca, Anda, Jim Jam, Woody and Nolan. They are from different backgrounds and first meet at Parkfield College, where they are studying for a BTEC in Media Studies. They quickly become friends. The College Collection follows them through their time at Parkfield College and the adventures and adversities they experience there.

The books reinforce high frequency words and the core phonic skills needed to access basic reading levels. Each set provides stories which bridge the gap between base level schemes and longer, more challenging texts. They are suitable for readers who still need a formatted reading scheme and are not yet ready to go onto free readers, but who still want interesting, engaging, real-life books. They are flexible, so no matter what other schemes you may be using, these books stand alone, enhancing and extending any reading experience.

The books are available to buy as a complete set as well as individually. Follow the links to take a closer link at the titles.


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