Manglish

Bringing Maths and English Together Across the Curriculum

By: Lisa Jane Ashes


£16.99


Size: 182 x 222mm

Pages : 168

ISBN : 9781781351017

Format: Paperback

Published: May 2014


Education is the business of developing minds for the future, but unlike most businesses we often find that schools fail to co-ordinate learning across all departments and therefore fall short of producing a fully rounded end product.

Lisa's mission is to transform thinking around curriculum and education to ensure that the disparity from one subject to another does not lead to a disparity in young people's understanding and readiness for the future. Learning, Lisa believes, should be co-ordinated across departments and she shows the world how it's done in her new book, Manglish: Bringing Maths and English Together Across the Curriculum.

The book shows how maths and English departments can develop creative, cross-curricular approaches to improving literacy and numeracy across the whole school and provides practical ideas and strategies to improve both. Covers: creative teaching, cross-curricular planning, collaboration, collaborative teaching, whole child development, literacy, numeracy and skills development.

For Key Stage 3 teachers across all subject areas, and school leaders with an interest in or responsibility for curriculum planning.

Contents:

Acknowledgements

Prologue: A taste of the future
1. Starting from scratch

Why we need a blank slate
What do your pupils need to know?
Making purposeful links
Big ideas and relevant learning
Collaboration
What does success look like?
2. Manglish in action
Thinking in Manglish
History, numbers and writing skills
The GAP SPLITT planning method
Citizenship and reading skills
English and statistics
Physical education, statistics and communication
3. Project X
Why run Project X?
Example Project X
Case study Project X in a single day
Further suggestions for Project X
4. Manglish our future
Why do we need Manglish?
Manglish and our future


Picture for author Lisa Jane Ashes

Lisa Jane Ashes



Lisa Jane Ashes is an experienced professional development provider for all things teaching and learning. Lisa has worked in many school-based roles, ranging from classroom support to leadership, and her ability to create collaborative curriculums that allow all learning to be taken forward, used and improved comes from her many and varied experiences in schools.

Click here to listen to Lisa on the Pivotal Podcast.

Click here to read Lisa's article on Innovate my School.


Reviews

  1. In the words of Ashes, -˜Manglish is a way of organising the curriculum collaboratively to create openings for cross-curricular links. It provides pupils with purposeful opportunities to explore how applicable maths, reading, writing and communication can be in other subject areas and the wider world'. A laudable aim.

    Ashes sets out to challenge teachers to analyse the skills used in their lessons and how they can then develop their teaching to encourage their pupils to apply these skills with greater autonomy and with greater awareness of the values of each skill. -˜The Manglish child is not just a bag of bits -” they are a complete and effective learner, primed for a successful future'. The methodology is most appropriate for Key Stage 3 but could also be employed with other Key Stages.

    Ashes begins by looking at schemes of work for English and Mathematics at Key Stage 3 and merging them together. She then embeds topics from other subjects to link with the Mathematics and the English. Her desire is for these methods to be embraced by the whole school; by doing so the planning may be more demanding but the collaboration should reduce workloads of teachers in terms of marking. Pupils' skills of applying maths, reading, writing and communication should be enhanced.

    When this collaboration is found to work Ashes suggests that schools should move onto -˜big ideas'. These are abstract topics which cut across all subjects. She gives examples of magic, big brother, top teams, going digital, going for gold-¦and illustrates how other subjects relate to them.

    The main theme of Manglish is the -˜Mat'. Mats give the criteria for each skill of applying maths, reading, writing and communication. There are six mats for different ability levels. An interesting planning method helps pupils organise their work. This is the GAP SPLITT -” genre, audience, purpose -” structure, presentational features, language, information, techniques, tone. There are many examples of Mats as well as numerous illustrations of GAP SPLITT. Assessment of pupils' outcomes is a vital part of the process.

    This book provides a framework for a whole-school cross-curricular strategy. There are many innovative and stimulating ideas -” all of which are worth discussing and considering within any school with Key Stage 3 pupils. Do Ashes methods work? Does Manglish really produce more articulate pupils with a sense of joined-up thinking? I would like to think it does -” perhaps it should be explored in many other schools and then we can determine whether Manglish does indeed live up to its laudable aims.

  2. Well written with clear purpose and vision. A guide to making numeracy and literacy work throughout school as cross curricular disciplines that add value to all subjects instead of being a bolt on. This has whole school strategies, examples of how to implement change for the classroom teacher and lots of practical tips to support students development in their writing. Plus some project and inter-departmental examples to enhance the curriculum. This is about doing the right thing for the learners and is very effective in communicating that vision. I'd recommend to anyone interested in developing literacy and numeracy in their school.
    See the blog here: http://ikonoklaste.wordpress.com/2014/11/01/100wordbookreview-manglish-by-lisa-jane-ashes/
  3. A paint-coated hand -” where's the maths in that? Where's the number and algebra, geometry and measures, statistics? From this intriguing beginning, Lisa Jane Ashes explains, in an extremely enthusiastic and readable way, how all teachers need to be asking -˜Where is the maths in my subject?' And -˜where is the reading, writing and communication'? And -˜how can teachers work collaboratively in creating a -˜joined-up approach' to support students in -˜mastering' them'? You are probably asking these questions in your own schools -” and you may well find your answers here in this book.

    In Manglish, Ashes, an English teacher, AST, trainer and CPD Leader in her school, and Independent Thinking Associate, explains the journey she and maths AST, Gary Mitchelson, took in her school to truly embed numeracy and literacy across the curriculum. In describing this journey she shows us how it can be done to foster pupils who are confident independent thinkers. She says they will not be asking why, but will be able to explain to the teacher why.

    So how is this done? The Manglish curriculum is collaborative planning; it is central data provided by English teachers; it is all teachers using Manglish mats for fully differentiated planning and thus understanding how to support the pupils that they teach without having to compromise the lesson. Sound good? It sure does.

    Ashes tells you how to put a Manglish curriculum into practice from scratch; she takes you through it step by step. It is fascinating and addictive reading, full of detailed long term plans showing how the subjects link and lead to the desired outcomes. The generosity of the book is extraordinary. There are detailed lesson outlines and Manglish mats for most subjects, and examples of how this method applies to all the writing purposes.

    This curriculum promises a lot of things and it seriously looks like it can deliver them. Manglish is essential reading, and even if you decide it is not going to be the revolution your school is looking for, you are still going to get a lot from it. I really enjoyed reading this - and I can't say that too often about pedagogical tomes. Manglish made me think -” a lot! It gave me lots of ideas for my own classroom teaching. And once I've passed it round a few of my colleagues here at school I imagine we will be discussing whether Manglish may have some merit for us. Nice one Lisa -” my favourite -˜school' read this year.
  4. This a book packed with practical ideas and strategies designed to intertwine literacy and numeracy across the curriculum, with the aim of improving both. The author's concept of 'manglish' has evolved into a way of creating a school curriculum that allows pupils to experience reading, writing, communication and maths 'purposefully in every lesson'. Furthermore, pupils experiencing the manglish curriculum should feel there is a point to everything they learn, and be motivated to take their studies to the next level. The author provides an antidote to the prevailing exam culture, where pupils are geared towards a single goal. Instead she purports a more holistic approach, whereby pupils ultimately achieve more by seeing the purpose behind what they are learning.
  5. In the words of Ashes -˜Manglish is a way of organising the curriculum collaboratively to create openings for cross-curricular links. It provides pupils with purposeful opportunities to explore how applicable maths, reading, writing and communication can be in other subject areas and the wider world'. A laudable aim.

    Ashes sets out to challenge teachers to analyse the skills used in their lessons and how they can then develop their teaching to encourage their pupils to apply these skills with greater autonomy and with greater awareness of the values of each skill. -˜The Manglish child is not just a bag of bits -” they are a complete and effective learner, primed for a successful future'. The methodology is most appropriate for Key Stage 3 but could also be employed with other Key Stages.

    Ashes begins by looking at schemes of work for English and mathematics at Key Stage 3 and merging them together. She then embeds topics from other subjects to link with the mathematics and the English. Her desire is for these methods to be embraced by the whole school, by doing so the planning may be more demanding but the collaboration should reduce workloads of teachers in terms of marking. Pupils' skills of applying maths, reading, writing and communication should be enhanced.

    When this collaboration is found to work Ashes suggests that schools should move onto -˜big ideas'. These are abstract topics which cut across all subjects. She gives examples of magic, big brother, top teams, going digital, going for gold-¦and illustrates how other subjects relate to them.

    The main theme of Manglish is the -˜Mat'. Mats give the criteria for each skill of applying maths, reading, writing and communication. There are six mats for different ability levels. An interesting planning method helps pupils organise their work. This is the GAP SPLITT -” genre, audience, purpose -” structure, presentational features, language, information, techniques, tone. There are many examples of Mats as well as numerous illustrations of GAP SPLITT. Assessment of pupils outcomes is a vital part of the process.

    This book provides a framework for a whole-school cross-curricular strategy. There are many innovative and stimulating ideas -” all of which are worth discussing and considering within any school with Key Stage 3 pupils. Do Ashes methods work? Does Manglish really produce more articulate pupils with a sense of joined-up thinking? I would like to think it does -” perhaps it should be explored in many other schools and then we can determine whether Manglish does indeed live up to its laudable aims.
  6. Is your KS3 curriculum delivering real progress for students? Is it just a waiting room for GCSEs? Can we be bold and brave enough to create a curriculum that is engaging, challenging and really strengthens the core skills our children need for life and work?
    Lisa Jane Ashes presents us with the ultimate -˜mash-up' that challenges our preconceived ideas about teaching subjects. We all know learning is about making connections and using skills across different contexts but we are all so much more comfortable teaching what we know and like. Lisa offers us a practical way to make those connections across subjects like maths and English which will most definitely enhance the flexibility of our learners and develop us as teachers. My own experience in implementing a project-based cross curricular curriculum at KS3 demonstrated the huge advantages to students and teachers of breaking down the barriers between subjects so that key skills could be more easily transferred.
    In this book Lisa gives detailed schemes and lesson plans with Manglish mats for assessment of progress and good advice about how to manage the programmes. If we want to develop deep learning of the key skills of numeracy and literacy it has to be pervasive an embedded in every lesson. This book gives you the tools to ensure KS3 can embed those skills so that by the time students get to KS4 they have the core skills required to fulfil their potential. In addition, all teachers will be developing their own transferable skills and getting in the habit of making links to other subjects in their teaching.
    The real world is not divided into subjects; students can see the relevance and value in seeing maths in geography and PE or English in science and art. This book will provide you with the resources you need to create an exciting 21st century curriculum that delivers core skills and truly engages students in the process of learning.
  7. This is a vital and exciting new publication, which asks - and answers - some of the -˜big questions' about learning. It is in the very best tradition of educational thought, with important implications for anyone who will need to manage complexity in their thinking. Her ideas will produce many desirable outcomes, not least -” if they will read it -” among politicians.

    -˜Manglish' offers an exciting and practical approach to the integrated curriculum which makes the seemingly impossible appear seamlessly practical. -˜Big questions' about curriculum are answered in manageable and differentiated small steps, which teachers can first imitate then create for themselves.

    The -˜Manglish' curriculum - reminiscent of the best of De Bono and adapted by the author's own -˜teacherly' creativity - offers exciting potential for liberating teachers from the strictures of subject compartmentalisation and for creating pupils who are independent and confident thinkers, able to shape the real world in which they live as both experts and co-workers.

    The -˜Manglish Mats' open the doors of a new perception, allowing teachers to -˜start from scratch' in designing a collaborative and multi-disciplinary curriculum without falling into the trap of forcing connections between subjects. They combine the best of -˜traditional' support and guidance with the potential for genuine challenge and creativity, in which pupils who are -˜hungry to learn' will develop -˜great minds -¦ see connections and -¦ shape our future.'
  8. So as a teacher do you think in Manglish. Do those around you think in Manglish? If not then then do yourself a favour and consider the content of this inspirational and well considered text. This book will help to create a generation of teachers who are not afraid to take hold of imaginative ideas and run with them. Furthermore it will develop a generation of teachers who see genuine links between subjects to bring about high quality deep learning. Finally the book is built around a rigour that will bring high expectations to those who follow its principles-¦. However be warned, learning will only become transformational when you pass the messages on. This nation needs whole schools to start thinking and working in Manglish.
  9. Who said English teachers couldn't do Maths? Some only to be expected inspiring ideas from Lisa which will bring together all areas of the curriculum.
    Lisa encourages us all to be galaxies rather than stars with her big thinking behind Manglish. If you want to prepare your students to collaborate and solve problems that don't yet exist, then this is a must read book.
  10. 'Manglish' is much more than a mash-up of Maths and English and is not just for teachers of these subjects. 'Manglish' is for all teachers, but especially those who work in a Secondary context and who realise the importance of developing students literacy and numeracy skills in context. In this book Lisa-Jane not only communicates the need for a new approach to the lower secondary curriculum, she shows how it can be done. Lisa expertly blends her easy to read, enthusiastic and encouraging style with real practical examples which make you feel that you could apply 'Manglish' in your own classroom. As Lisa explains, any teacher could learn for her approach, but this book would be particularly relevant for school leaders who are looking for a practical way to incorporate the development of Maths and English skills across the lower secondary curriculum. Although primarily focused at English schools, this book would also be of interest to secondary school leaders in Scotland who are looking to more fully integrate the development of literacy and numeracy skills across the broad general education phase.
  11. In 'Manglish', Lisa Jane Ashes presents her answer to a critical key question for any curriculum designers: “What is the purpose of the KS3 curriculum?” Her answer is 'Manglish'.

    'Manglish' invites teachers and pupils to identify and share the opportunities and connections that exist between subjects and be ambitious in finding ways to develop these even further. The goal to develop independent, self-aware learners by KS3 teachers is placed firmly at the heart of this book. The result is a practical, creative and inspirational solution to the problem of disjointed and incoherent learning experiences in KS3.

    'Manglish' is an invaluable guide for anybody who wants to break down subject barriers and design engaging, purposeful and meaningful learning opportunities across KS3. Lisa Jane Ashes draws on her wealth of school-based experiences to present a step-by-step guide that invites teachers to break down compartmentalised curriculum planning and open it up to the possibilities of thinking, writing and calculating in all subjects.

    This book is practical and thought-provoking in equal measure. Lisa Jane Ashes provides coherent templates for collaborative planning and addresses some pertinent questions along the way. Beyond this, she encourages teachers to unleash their creativity and subject expertise, suggesting innovative ideas for connecting themes, concepts and transferable skills across the curriculum. 'Manglish' shows teachers how pupils can actively improve their reading, writing, communication and mathematical skills both in and across every subject.

    Embracing a -˜Manglish Mindset' allows teachers and pupils to drain every last droplet of learning out of the KS3 curriculum. This approach inspires teachers to go beyond simply introducing literacy and numeracy across the curriculum. This connected approach to curriculum and lesson design releases the potential of purposeful reading in science, shows us what quality writing in history looks like, what powerful communication in art feels like and what confident numeracy in geography can result in for every pupil in KS3. Thinking in this way enables pupils to make connections between concepts that might, in a pre-'Manglish' curriculum, seem entirely unrelated. The 'Manglish' approach results in pupils being able to create new ideas and apply knowledge and skills from across the curriculum.

    In 'Manglish', Lisa Jane Ashes has gleefully taken up the gauntlet of developing literacy and numeracy across the curriculum. 'Manglish' is both a personal story and a professional guide. Lisa Jane Ashes shows us how to create coherence in KS3 curriculum planning and the result is an imaginative and eminently practical guide for everybody involved in curriculum design. 'Manglish' will inform thinking, stimulate discussion and, most importantly, design purposeful and meaningful learning opportunities for every pupil in KS3.
  12. Lisa Ashes enthusiasm is palpable. She writes with wit and verve: every page is enthused with her impish delight at confounding expectations and subverting tired certainties. But she is far more than an aficionado of fun - the hard work and good, practical common sense that has gone into creating a useable template for designing a curriculum based on making explicit links between subjects whilst still maintaining useful division between disciplines, is admirable. In the hands of a less skilled practitioner or less thoughtful school leader, this project could so easily have been an empty exercise in bland content-life thematic learning that has bedevilled so many other attempts to make the curriculum -˜relevant' and -˜accessible'. Fortunately though, Ms. Ashes is ever at pains to stress the paramount importance of subject content and of building students' knowledge. Manglish also challenges all teachers to think beyond their comfortable routines and consider the ways in which we inadvertently but actively undermine each others' efforts to teach the building blocks of maths, English, history, science, DT etc. If we've ever been glib about algebra or spelling, we've done our pupils a disservice. This book eloquently reminds us that while our duties as teachers of subjects are hugely and rightly important, we must never forget our responsibilities as teachers of children.

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