We hope to see you all at the Learning To Shape Birmingham Conference 2017 - Only 1 week away!

15 September 2017

Surviving the current winds of educational change may feel like being at sea in a small boat as storm clouds gather and a big sea builds. Government policy changes, increasing financial pressures, teacher shortages, increased accountability and ever-changing Ofsted requirements each represent separate storm systems that that can cause your boat to be swamped or even to capsize completely. Learning to Shape Birmingham 2017 will help all of us navigate the challenges ahead. Reading the charts and interpreting the weather forecasts, choosing the right sails and plotting the best course, ensuring strong radio contact, checking safety equipment and knowing emergency procedures, including how to call for help. More than ever we know how important it is that we lose no one overboard, let alone have any more sinkings. With disasters avoided, making our boats go faster and mastering the sea can be a joy!

The conference will cover the latest in Government policy. Learning from successful practice nationally we will focus on all settings, regardless of phase or designation.

This years event begins with an afternoon keynote address (at approx 16.30) and dinner on the evening of Thursday 21st September 2017. A full day™s conference takes place on Friday 22nd September 2017.



Click here to find out more details regarding the event and book your tickets - Don't miss out!


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