What defines geography? – The importance of setting a powerful curriculum

03 March 2021

œAnything is geography.

These three words defined the thinking around the geography curriculum when I started teaching in 2004 and, for a while, this seemed hugely exciting. Geography is such a broad discipline that we could “ we were told “ study anything in our classrooms, put anything into our programmes of study, at least until we had to prepare for an exam specification, and we could call it geography.

And so we did.

We would create units on the geography of crime in which pupils would consider how different stakeholders felt about a crime that had taken place and, as a result, develop empathy. Or study the geography of sport and plot the location of Premier League football stadiums and, as a result, relate the subject to pupils™ interests.



They could study the geography of fashion and learn about the deplorable conditions of sweatshops and, as a result, hopefully change their shopping habits. What mattered wasn™t the content but the result of studying it. Read the full article here.

Discover Mark's new book Powerful Geography here.


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