Neuroscience for Teachers

Applying research evidence from brain science

By: Richard Churches , Eleanor Dommett , Ian Devonshire


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Ebook


Size: 222 x 182mm

Pages : 280

ISBN : 9781785831836

Format: Paperback

Published: September 2017


Expertly unpacks, in an easy-to-read and instantly useable way, what every teacher needs to know about the brain and how we really learn ' and what that suggests for how they should teach.

Foreword by Baroness Susan Greenfield CBE.

Everyone is curious about the brain ' including your learners! Not only can knowing more about the brain be a powerful way to understand what happens when your pupils ' and, of course, you ' pick up new knowledge and skills, but it can also offer a theoretical basis for established or new classroom practice. And as the field of neuroscience uncovers more of nature's secrets about the way we learn ' and further augments what we already know about effective teaching ' this book advocates more efficient pedagogies rooted in a better understanding and application of neuroscience in education.

By surveying a wide range of evidence in specific areas such as metacognition, memory, mood and motivation, the teenage brain and how to cater for individual differences, Neuroscience for Teachers shares relevant, up-to-date information to provide a suitable bridge for teachers to transfer the untapped potential of neuroscientific findings into practical classroom approaches. The key issues, challenges and research are explained in clear language that doesn't assume a prior level of knowledge on the topic that would otherwise make it inaccessible ' therefore enabling more teachers to better comprehend the lessons from neuroscience ' while the authors also take care to expose the ways in which neuromyths' can arise in education in order to help them avoid these pitfalls.

Laid out in an easy-to-use format, each chapter features: Research Zones' highlighting particular pieces of research with a supplementary insight into the area being explored; Reflection' sections that give you something to think about, or suggest something you might try out in the classroom; and concluding Next steps' that outline how teachers might incorporate the findings into their own practice. The authors have also included a glossary of terms covering the book's technical vocabulary to aid the development of teachers' literacy in the field of neuroscience.

Packed with examples and research-informed tips on how to enhance personal effectiveness and improve classroom delivery, Neuroscience for Teachers provides accessible, practical guidance supported by the latest research evidence on the things that will help your learners to learn better.

Suitable for LSAs, NQTs, teachers, middle leaders, local authority advisers and anyone working with learners.

Contents include:

1. Neuroscience in the classroom ' principles and practice: getting started

2. Learning and remembering: attention, learning and memory

3. Metacognition: why it pays to teach your pupils how to think about how they think

4. Emotions and learning: classroom climate, stress and motivation

5. The individual in the classroom: what neuroscience can tell us about different abilities and some special educational needs in the classroom

6. The adolescent brain: why teenagers behave like teenagers

7. Surprises from cognitive psychology and neuroscience: why making things more difficult and less enjoyable for students in the short term can enhance long-term learning

8. Concluding remarks: developing your scientific literacy and understanding of controlled research


Picture for author Richard Churches

Richard Churches

Dr Richard Churches has been an advanced skills teacher, a senior manager in challenging inner-city schools, a government adviser, an education consultant and the lead adviser for education reform and evidence-based practice at Education Development Trust. He has led many major policy initiatives in England and across the world, and is currently programme director for the DfE Future Teaching Scholars programme. His doctoral research was experimental and explored areas of charismatic leadership associated with altered states of consciousness.

Clinical trials' approach to research to see what works best for students. You can read Dr Richard Churches full article from Education Development Trust here.


Picture for author Eleanor Dommett

Eleanor Dommett

Dr Eleanor Dommett is a Senior Lecturer in Biological Psychology and Neuroscience at the Institute of Psychology, Psychiatry and Neuroscience, part of King's College London. Her research focuses on models of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and mechanisms of action of therapeutic drugs in this condition. She has conducted research at Sheffield University, Oxford University and the Open University and has taught at a variety of institutions. She is currently teaching on the BSc Psychology at King's and has a special interest in technology-enhanced learning.


Picture for author Ian Devonshire

Ian Devonshire

Dr Ian Devonshire is a neuroscientist and lecturer who has spearheaded a range of innovative, inter-disciplinary research projects involving universities, schools, private companies, charities and the government. Ian has worked in research laboratories at the Universities of Oxford and Sheffield and is currently based at Nottingham University Medical School whilst also holding an associate lectureship at the Open University. 


Reviews

  1. Today we realise that neuroscience and education go together, you can't think about one without the other. This is a comprehensive and accessible look at what we know about neuroscience and learning, and how knowledge and application of neuroscience in education contexts can help us to create the best environments for children to learn. They look at memory, emotional development, special educational needs and metacognition among other things, providing practical guidance. I think this will become an essential text for all of us working with children.
  2. -‹"My reading viewpoint

    I have been interested in neuroscience and its application to the classroom ever since I heard Clare Sealy discuss it at a conference. Following this, I read a number of her blogs and Craig Barton's book, both of which discuss areas including long term memory, cognitive load and strategies to help learning stick. I became somewhat fascinated by the brain and our ability to learn and remember and when I saw this book I jumped at the chance to learn more. My reading viewpoint is one of curiosity and I am keen to consider how I might apply this knowledge to the work I do with schools.

    Summary

    While the title and subject matter of the book was certainly a little daunting, I need not have worried. The authors take the time to explain key terminology in a number of ways including through diagrams and a glossary, with key words highlighted in bold throughout the text. The text is accessible and clear and I genuinely feel I understand even the more complex aspects covered in the book.

    The layout is particularly brilliant. Each chapter begins with learning outcomes, summarising what the reader should understand by the end of the chapter; this is supported by -˜next steps' at the end and regular reflection points encouraging the reader to relate the science to the classroom. There is also a range of visual elements to break the text up - I particularly liked small grey boxes containing key quotes from the paragraph or section.

    The book does exactly what I expected - provides a range of evidence and research based neuroscience and explores application in the classroom. The content is wide-ranging, from maths anxiety to the working memory, metacognition to the role of emotions. It is a fascinating insight into how students learn and remember and how teachers might use this information to enhance the learning in their classroom.

    My key takeaways

    1. Some elements of learning are genetic, but environment plays a huge role in development. As someone who regularly battles -˜fixed mindset' internal views, it was interesting to read about what is considered hereditary and what is not. The authors point out that there is a huge amount of evidence to suggest the brain has an ability to -˜change and develop in response to its environment' and that intelligence is all about the connections made in our brains between concepts, but also that some aspects such as -˜intelligence in the general sense', -˜language acquisition' and -˜reading ability' are hereditary to -˜a greater or lesser extent'.

    2. Repeating knowledge is really important but delivery needs to be thought about. At several points, the text recognises that in order for concepts to be secure in long term memory and for these to be more easily recalled, rehearsal and repetition is needed. This repetition needs careful thought and research suggests that varying the way in which information is used and presented is more beneficial than simply revising it. This may seem obvious, I suppose, but for me it will make me really think about different ways of presenting key concepts such as number bonds and multiplication tables.

    3. Working memory is fragile and teachers need to be aware of this. Working memory is limited and easily overloaded, meaning learning and transmission to long term memory is at risk. The book discusses lots of ways in which teachers can ensure working memory is not overloaded, including careful consideration of pace and step by step instruction.

    4. Metacognition (thinking about thinking) is a skill worth developing. Research suggests that these skills -˜do not tend to develop naturally' and a whole chapter is dedicated to discussion of and strategies for developing this in the classroom. Again, the text cites the importance of making connections between learning.

    I think you should read this book if-¦

    - You are interested in neuroscience and how the brain works and want to read something accessible and linked to your profession
    - You are a teacher constantly asking -˜why can't they remember this?'!"

    Click here to read the review on Lisa's blog.
  3. "This book opens with a foreword by Susan Greenfield, an eminent neurobiologist, writer and broadcaster, who praises the authors for producing a text that provides accessible and accurate information for teachers about the brain and what research evidence has to say in terms of effective classroom interventions.

    The book covers topics such as: principles and practice of neuroscience in the classroom; attention learning and memory; emotions and learning; SEN including dyslexia and autism; and the adolescent brain and peer pressure.

    The book is well structured, as each chapter opens with an overview of content and concludes with suggestions for further related reading and research. There are numerous cartoons that help to explain concepts relating to neuroscience research, and puzzles to reinforce  learning concepts.

    The authors provide useful examples of ways in which teachers can improve classroom practice through stimulating experiences that recognise the relationship between the brain, behaviour and learning. They stress the significant impact teachers can exert on their students' thinking, for example,  when they have a greater understanding of brain function and classroom performance in relation to learning differences and interventions.



    This book provides teachers with much advice and support in terms of adapting and refining their classroom practice, based on sound academic and  evidence-based reviews."
  4. Having been teaching, researching educational practice, and leading teacher training for ten years now, I find Neuroscience for Teachers has filled an important space in the development of a research-driven approach to pedagogy that we are all trying to establish. By making neuroscientific material accessible to teachers in a way which directly links to classroom practice, this book provides a resource available nowhere else.

    For busy teachers, who have little time for engaging with original research from the many, many multi-disciplinary fields which might possibly be relevant to the practice, a resource such as this is new and invaluable. It enables teachers to quickly master practices that work to improve learning. Even more importantly, it explains in an accessible way, the science underpinning the -˜what works' advice; this is a vital new tool to educate teachers about why we do what we do, but also in empowering teachers to resist unscientific pedagogical advice.

    In the everyday life of teachers, the way the book is organised is exceptionally valuable, as teachers and teacher-trainers can use it section by section to dip into relevant areas. For example, for teachers like myself struggling with the vast amount of content students must learn to cope with the demanding new GCSEs and A Levels, a new kind of pedagogy is demanded; turning to the section on -˜attention', we find a series of absolutely clear and practical strategies for maximising the right kind of student attention, with the scientific rationale behind these explained. The teacher is thus equipped with pedagogical approaches fit for their specific need very quickly, but can also work from a perspective of enhanced professional understanding about why these are the right approaches. This book is thus about improving student outcomes, and also about improving the professionalism of teachers as practitioners of a complex science.

    As a designer of teacher training and Continuing Professional Development programmes, this book is also invaluable to me in planning training for other teachers. The sections on mood, emotion, stress and other aspects of the developing adolescent brain approach teaching from an important new perspective, encouraging teachers to think beyond how they deliver, but to consider the importance of how information is received by teenagers in particular; to be able to discuss this from a scientific perspective elevates this debate above the stereotypical, and allows teachers to consider aspects of learning that they might not otherwise feel empowered to do - and in turn to improve student outcomes.



    In terms of cost effectiveness, this book synthesises a huge body of research into the relevant, practical information teachers need. Teachers want to be involved in research, but often the best involvement is to have a clear, accessible understanding of the huge body of research out there, and this books makes that precisely available to any reader. I have used this in teacher training, and plan to use it much more in an integrated way in future training sessions to bring new perspectives to the attention of teachers I work with.  Few teachers will have time - or possibly the academic background and resources - to explore this body of information first hand. This book is thus a brilliant new addition to our pedagogical resources by making this valuable body of work available to us all.
  5. The innovative nature of the research 

    For teachers and school leaders the implications of the research presented in the book, for example for curriculum design, are profound. Too much of what teachers know about neuroscience comes from tiny gibbets on social media and the possibility of bad decision-making based on scant or limited knowledge is huge; Dylan Wiliam's phrase about -˜lethal mutations' springs to mind. But in this book the main findings are presented in an easy to digest format which any teacher can relate to their pedagogy.  This is thus an important book and which tidies up lots of misconceptions - for example the differences between spaced and distributed theory - as well as presenting a wealth of new information.

    The impact on learning and the work of the teacher in the classroom, to what extent and in which areas

    Specific pedagogies, for example meta-cognition, are explained. Even after five years on from the Sutton Trust/ EEF toolkit https://educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk/evidence-summaries/teaching-learning-toolkit/  many teachers and indeed school leaders still struggle to explain what this word means and this books gives a fascinating insight into the neuroscience behind the approach.

    How the title supports or enhances the everyday life or work of teachers, pupils or schools

    An example of this is that directly using the research in this book schools in Lincolnshire have set about changing their approach and over 1,000 pupils are now involved in trials related to neuroscience. Areas such as the teaching of number facts and language acquisition have received more intense focus and
    investigation. The research has promoted a rethink about how teachers present information and, crucially, how to revisit what has been taught, for example by using expanded retrieval.

    Cost-effectiveness in terms of educational aims and results - not just price



    The pedagogies outlined in this book - including approaches to evaluation of practice - are presented in a way which aims at quality first teaching. It is abundantly clear that the research has the possibility to positively impact on pupil progress through clear, easy to adopt changes in practice. School leaders need only find effective professional development -through coaching and in-class support for example - to be able to initiate the strategies outlined.
  6. I found this topic quite conservative in it's approach as I have a background in NLP so therefore have a slightly different viewpoint with regards to how the mind works. However, the layout and style is very impressive and the authors are very thorough and informative. I like the fact that references are regularly included at the foot of the page.
  7. In Neuroscience for Teachers, authors Richard Churches, Eleanor Dommett and Ian Devonshire demystify the essentials of neuroscientific jargon and explore the background research which underpins this hot topic. 

    This book illustrates the many ways in which an appreciation of neuroscience can enlighten the teacher and explains how the application of research evidence in practice can drastically improve learning effectiveness. The authors explore the importance of the classroom climate and the learner's memory processes and attention span, as well as the numerous ways in which a knowledge of these factors can be applied in the teaching context.

    A useful section dissects metacognition and outlines phases for planning, monitoring and evaluating a given learning task which can provide fodder for the learner's vital critical reflection. The authors wisely do not neglect the role of the limbic system and its link with the learner's moods, emotions, motivation and teacher-learner relationships. Two important sections are also devoted to learning difficulties and factors which can contribute to adolescent peer pressure.



    Neuroscience for Teachers is a timely contribution to educational literature and one which should grace the bookshelves of all teachers, trainers and educators.
  8. With  the  current emphasis  on raising aspirations , personal  skills  and achievement levels of learners within schools and colleges, Richard Churches and his fellow authors have untangled the  scientific jargon around neuroscience  and cognitive psychology. The authors successfully  engage the reader  in a range of practical activities and strategies  that  promote awareness  of the application of neuroscience  and its contribution to the delivery and management of learning. 

    The structure and easily read style of the authors enables the reader to assess a range of neuroscience topics such as working memory, metacognition, motivation, learners with additional needs and the adolescent brain .  There are excellent  tips on how the research evidence can be effectively used to support practice. In particular, the research zone  and reflection sections enable the reader to balance ideas in terms of implications  for their own practice. In this respect, the sections  on  motivation to learn, autism spectrum disorder, peer pressure, risk taking, seeing testing as a learning event are all addressing key issues  and supporting the reader in how to take the neuroscience evidence forward in practical terms. The authors are to be congratulated on promoting in depth practical awareness  and applications of research with regard to issues which confront teachers and managers in schools and colleges.
  9. This book opens with a foreword by Susan Greenfield, an eminent neurobiologist, writer and broadcaster, who praises the authors for producing a text that provides accessible and accurate information for teachers about the brain and what research evidence has to say in terms of effective classroom interventions.

    The book covers topics such as:

    '· Neuroscience in the classroom: principles and practice

    '· Attention learning and memory

    '· Emotions and learning: stress and motivation

    '· Special educational needs including dyslexia and autistic spectrum disorders

    '· The adolescent brain and peer pressure

    The book is well structured, as each chapter opens with an overview of content and concludes with suggestions for further related reading and research. There are numerous cartoons that help to explain concepts relating to neuroscience research and puzzles to reinforce learning concepts.

    The authors provide numerous examples of ways in which teachers can improve classroom practice through stimulating experiences that recognize the relationship between the brain, behaviour and learning. They stress the significant impact teachers can exert on their students' thinking when they have a greater understanding of, for example, an appreciation of brain function and classroom performance in relation to learning differences and interventions.

    The book closes with advice on teacher-led research methods and an extensive glossary.This book provides teachers with much advice and support in terms of adapting and refining their classroom practice, based on sound academic and evidence-based reviews.
  10. Gradually, an important and growing evidence of the impact of understanding neuroscience in terms of learning and education has started to inform pedagogy, along with a better appreciation of how we learn. Yet, there is a lot of confusion and misunderstanding to what neuroscience science is, and many within the education sector would struggle to explain the principles, science and research to recognise how the brain processes information. Fundamentally, neuroscience literally means the -˜science of the nervous system', making use of the principles and many techniques from the main science disciplines of physics, chemistry and biology.

    Trying to connect research in neuroscience with education, Richard Churches, Eleanor Dommett and Ian Devonshire have compiled an easily digestible book that explores the principles and exploration of how teaching practice can have a positive improvement and consideration of how we all learn, being especially informative to the education sector, that can help students develop strategies, habits and environments that encourage sustained learning. In their book, “Neuroscience for Teachers - Applying research evidence from brain science”, the authors explore some of the compelling and informative science that is starting to connect education with neuroscience, explaining how attention, learning and memory impact on building knowledge in students. Making connections with previous learning, along with an understanding of the (4) different types of attention (from a neuroscience perspective) along with understanding inattentional blindness, the book guides educators to become aware of how the brain works, and what strategies can be used to support learning with all students.

    Sustaining attention and the use of working memory in the classroom is also given attention in the book, combining respected theories developed by Bandura and Vygotsky (for example), but also linking more recent research projects (such as the study completed by Dikker et.al, and reported at https://ukedchat.com/2017/04/28/students-brains-sync/), that suggested that certain types of engagement between teachers and pupils sets up a -˜scaffold' for social interaction and more engagement. The book continues by offering reflection activities for the reader, considering neurological strategies evident in practice, but also guiding lesson structures that could improve the potential for remembering. Research Zones are scattered throughout the book, offering a reference point to the ideas, strategies and the science showcased throughout. Notably, reference is given towards metacognition, with a fascinating exploration underscoring the basis of metacognition from a neuroscience perspective.

    As educators will recognise, the impact of emotions and mood can play a crucial part to learning, and the factors affecting mood and emotions are considered within the book with attention given to how teachers can manipulate mood in the classroom positively.

    Ultimately, understanding the individuals who enter our classroom environments is central in what neuroscience can tell us about different abilities, but many teachers teach adolescents, and their brains undergo significant changes during this sensitive stage of life. Again, neuroscience is there to help explain peer pressure, the importance of being liked and interpreting emotional outbursts.



    The book concludes by noting that any pedagogy based on neuroscience will need to be trialled in different subject areas, in different school contexts, and with different groups of children. There is no quick-fix silver bullet, but teacher-led research programmes using controlled research designs and collaborations could advance teaching as an evidence-enriched profession. A handy template of cognitive psychology themes is offered that could be worth considering as a subject for a research project. So, if you're an educator who is interested in neuroscience and possibly considering implementing a research element to your teaching practice, then this book makes a great starting and reference point to progress your curiosity.

    Everyone is curious about the brain including your learners! Not only can knowing more about the brain be a powerful way to understand what happens when your pupils and, of course, you pick up new knowledge and skills, but it can also offer a theoretical basis for established or new classroom practice. And as the field of neuroscience uncovers more of nature s secrets about the way we learn and further augments what we already know about effective teaching this book advocates more efficient pedagogies rooted in a better understanding and application of neuroscience in education.

    By surveying a wide range of evidence in specific areas such as metacognition, memory, mood and motivation, the teenage brain and how to cater for individual differences, -˜Neuroscience for Teachers' shares relevant, up-to-date information to provide a suitable bridge for teachers to transfer the untapped potential of neuroscientific findings into practical classroom approaches. The key issues, challenges and research are explained in clear language that doesn t assume a prior level of knowledge on the topic that would otherwise make it inaccessible therefore enabling more teachers to better comprehend the lessons from neuroscience while the authors also take care to expose the ways in which neuromyths can arise in education in order to help them avoid these pitfalls.

    Laid out in an easy-to-use format, each chapter features: Research Zones highlighting particular pieces of research with a supplementary insight into the area being explored; Reflection sections that give you something to think about, or suggest something you might try out in the classroom; and concluding Next steps that outline how teachers might incorporate the findings into their own practice. The authors have also included a glossary of terms covering the book s technical vocabulary to aid the development of teachers literacy in the field of neuroscience.

    Packed with examples and research-informed tips on how to enhance personal effectiveness and improve classroom delivery, -˜Neuroscience for Teachers' provides accessible, practical guidance supported by the latest research evidence on the things that will help your learners to learn better.

    Suitable for LSAs, NQTs, teachers, middle leaders, local authority advisers and anyone working with learners.

    Contents include:

    1. Neuroscience in the classroom principles and practice: getting started

    2. Learning and remembering: attention, learning and memory

    3. Metacognition: why it pays to teach your pupils how to think about how they think

    4. Emotions and learning: classroom climate, stress and motivation

    5. The individual in the classroom: what neuroscience can tell us about different abilities and some special educational needs in the classroom

    6. The adolescent brain: why teenagers behave like teenagers

    7. Surprises from cognitive psychology and neuroscience: why making things more difficult and less enjoyable for students in the short term can enhance long-term learning



    8. Concluding remarks: developing your scientific literacy and understanding of controlled research
  11. This is a fantastic resource for teachers. 

    It perfectly bridges the gap between neuroscience and classroom practice.

    It clearly describes the best research from neuroscience and cognitive psychology and provides practical tips to ensure teachers can apply these ideas to improve classroom performance. It doesn't make the mistake of cherry-picking bits of research to justify the author's beliefs, it is balanced and thorough. It also provides ideas to encourage teachers to undertake their own classroom based research. 



    Schools need to understand and be confident in applying neuroscience and this book is an ideal resource to underpin this process.
  12. Neuroscience for Teachers provides a comprehensive, up-to-date introduction to the key issues, debates, challenges, methods and research findings in the field of educational neuroscience. It is written accessibly and contains everything that a teacher needs to know about neuroscience, describing where this knowledge comes from. Most fascinating are the tips given to teachers, which are very clearly drawn from the evidence base as it currently stands. This has the added bonus of making Neuroscience for Teachers a useful resource for researchers who carry out related work but may be stumped when considering how their work impacts upon education.

    Whether the reader is a teacher or a scientist, they will come away with a deep understanding of the educational neuroscience knowledge base, how we got there, and how we might use this information in the classroom.
  13. I've read lots of books about teaching which love to tell you -˜how' to teach, but very few - if any - which tell you the underlying reason -˜why' each technique is effective. Neuroscience for Teachers tells you why effective teaching practices work with a clarity that makes it essential reading for everyone working in schools. The clear explanation of each neuroscientific study empowers teachers to take back control of their pedagogy from the incoherent advice peddled to schools for decades by consultants and/or politicians. The reflections provide an accessible bridge from quite technical neuroscientific findings to practical classroom approaches. I love that it tells you when and why scientific findings aren't applicable to the classroom, and how it exposes the ways in which -˜neuromyths' arise in education to help you avoid these pitfalls in the future.

    Everyone working in education will find Neuroscience  for Teachers valuable, and anyone invested in effective teaching and learning should read it.
  14. Written in a clear and engaging way, Neuroscience for Teachers avoids the trap of overgeneralisation which is so commonly observed when neuroscience is taken outside of academia. The authors introduce the key neuroscience topics relevant to education and describe in detail the evidence available in order to help teachers reflect on how this may benefit their practice. In addition to expanding their knowledge about the brain and cognition, it will also develop teachers' research literacy and improve their ability to assess neuroscientific findings more critically.

    I believe Neuroscience for Teachers may become a key reference for teachers desiring to better understand and apply neuroscience to their practice.
  15. Churches, Dommett and Devonshire offer a wonderfully comprehensive account of the developing relationships between neuroscience and education.

    Using clear language with ample illustration, Neuroscience for Teachers is written with a keen eye on the professional relevance to teachers and is likely to become the definitive text on this topic.
  16. I wish this book had existed when I was teaching! Neuroscience for Teachers is a wonderfully easy read, arming teachers with the most up-to-date research about learning from the fields of neuroscience and psychology.
  17. The marriage of neuroscience and education is a partnership that is full of potential to improve young people's learning and development outcomes. Drawing upon their experience of collaborating with educators, Churches, Dommett and Devonshire have produced a book that combines the very latest research with useful rules of thumb for teachers and provides examples of how these ideas might be converted into classroom practice.

    Neuroscience for Teachers unfolds in such a way that newcomers can stay on the path with just the core ideas, while readers with more experience in neuroscience and education can take side roads and explore the research in more detail. The authors also help teachers avoid pitfalls by pointing out the common and newly emerging misinterpretations and -˜neuromyths' that readers might encounter elsewhere.

    I am sure that all educators will find some ideas in this book that are affirming, some that are challenging, and others that will inspire creative twists on their existing practice.
  18. Neuroscience for Teachers is one of those rare books that manages to blend academic theory with excellent practical advice for the classroom. A timely piece of work, considering the growing interest in applying the knowledge of what we know about the human brain to the field of education.

    No stone has been left unturned in sifting through the wealth of evidence available on neuroscience and its implications for education as the authors explore a range of fields of study to deepen understanding of key areas - from memory and metacognition, to emotion, motivation and the enigma that is the typical adolescent brain. There are also a number of -˜next steps' and suggestions at the end of every chapter, outlining how teachers might incorporate this evidence into their practice.

    Both intuitive and informative, Neuroscience for Teachers fills an enormous hole in teacher education with depth, clarity and accessibility, and will satisfy both novice and expert alike. For educators, I'd do more than recommend it: I'd make it mandatory to their professional learning. Neuroscience  for Teachers will change the way you teach.
  19. Neuroscience for Teachers by Churches, Dommett and Devonshire is an invaluable exploration of the growing collaboration between neuroscience, psychology and education - and the potential this offers teachers and schools.

    A fantastic introductory guide for teachers in the early stages of their careers, and those interested in evidence-based practice, it serves to develop teacher scientific literacy, negate -˜neuromyths' about learning and the brain, and signpost key articles and research for further thought and discussion. The text is positive and accessible without being patronising: the scientific definitions and theoretical introductions are clear and are linked back to practical application to, and implications for, the teacher's own classroom and students. With open questions to consider and a -˜Research Zone' focus in every chapter, Neuroscience for Teachers helps improve literacy in the vocabulary of neuroscience and helps develop a better understanding of research methodologies.

    The eight chapters provide particular insight into metacognition, the adolescent brain and working memory, combined with a focus on the implications and emerging questions for the teacher and classroom. What is particularly satisfying is the recognition that children are unique individuals and that the classroom context is significant: there is no simplification of research and evidence here.

    Neuroscience for Teachers is exactly the kind of guide I wish I'd had available to me as a student teacher fascinated by the science of learning, and I can see it being profoundly useful to teachers and those designing CPD, curricula and initial teacher education everywhere.
  20. It is very clear that neuroscience must be relevant to all involved in teaching: understanding how we learn is fundamental to effective practice. To this end the authors' clear emphasis on evidence-based approaches is highly commendable in recognising the importance of taking proper evidence seriously when seeking to understand what really works in the teaching and learning process. Neuroscience for Teachers is centred on that approach and enables any teacher to access the fundamentals of neuroscience easily. All explanations are clear and simple and do not assume a level of knowledge on the topic that would otherwise make it inaccessible.

    I would certainly recommend Neuroscience  for Teachers as a really useful book that would greatly benefit all teachers - at any stage of their career - who have an interest in neuroscience and its importance to teaching. It seems especially relevant to anyone who is training to teach, and it is hard to imagine why any trainee would not find this evidence-based, practical and interesting book highly relevant to their teacher training programme. Reading it would be a very good use of some of their scarce time.
  21. A comprehensive and remarkably up-to-date account of the contributions that neuroscience and cognitive psychology are making to teaching practice.

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